Invited Speakers

Vivasvan Soni
Associate Professor of English Literature, Northwestern University

Vivasvan Soni,Associate Professor of English Literature at Northwestern UNiversity

Vivasvan Soni,
Associate Professor of English Literature at Northwestern UNiversity

Paper: In Search of Aesthetic Judgment: Shaftesbury’s “Sensus Communis” and “Soliloquy”

Vivasvan Soni (Ph.D. Duke University, 2000) studies and teaches eighteenth-century British literature, as well as critical and literary theory. His book, Mourning Happiness: Narrative and the Politics of Modernity, was published by Cornell University Press in 2010 and was the recipient of the Modern Language Association’s eighteenth annual Prize for a First Book. In it, he traces the narrative transformations in the eighteenth-century which produce a modern conception of happiness, arguing that these transformations result in the erasure of happiness as a guiding idea in politics. He discovers in classical ideas of happiness, particularly Solon’s proverb “Call no man happy until he is dead,” the outlines of a concept of happiness that might sustain a utopian politics. In their citation for Soni’s book, the MLA prize committee noted that “Mourning Happiness powerfully transcends the usual field limitations of academic scholarship, making a compelling case for how an ancient Greek construal of happiness could reawaken the radical force of that denuded concept in our own present.… This provocative study affirms the importance of narrative form to one of our most upheld and yet least examined ideals.”

Eleonore Stump
Robert J. Henle Professor Philosophy, Saint Louis University

Eleonore Stump, Robert J. Henle Professor Philosophy at Saint Louis University

Eleonore Stump, Robert J. Henle Professor Philosophy at Saint Louis University

Paper: Reliable Judgments: Faith, Wisdom, and the Transmission of Knowledge Through Testimony

Eleonore Stump is the Robert J. Henle Professor Philosophy at Saint Louis University, where she has taught since 1992. She has published extensively in medieval philosophy, philosophical theology, and metaphysics. Among her books are Boethius’s De topicis differentiis (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1978; second printing, 1989); The Cambridge Companion to Aquinas, (with Norman Kretzmann) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993); Aquinas’s Moral Theory: Essays in Honor of Norman Kretzmann, (with Scott MacDonald),  (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1999); Aquinas, (in the series The Arguments of the Philosophers) (London and New York: Routledge, 2003); and Wandering in Darkness: Narrative and the Problem of Suffering (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010). ). She is past president of the Society of Christian Philosophers, the American Catholic Philosophical Association, and the American Philosophical Association, Central Division.

Florian Klinger
Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Germanic Studies, and the College; Director of Undergraduate Studies, University of Chicago

Florian Klinger

Florian Klinger

Paper: Judgment and Becoming

Florian Klinger joined the department in autumn 2012. He graduated from the Peter Szondi Institute of Comparative Literature at Freie Universität Berlin, and received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Stanford University in 2010. He is a member of Harvard’s Society of Fellows, where he currently holds an appointment as a Junior Fellow. Florian has had a previous career as a professional musician and holds an Artist Diploma, Violin, from Hochschule für Musik und Theater München. His book Urteilen, an inquiry into the structure of human judgment in modernity, was published by diaphanes Verlag, Zürich/Berlin in 2011. A second book, Theorie der Form. Gerhard Richter und die Kunst des pragmatischen Zeitalters, a pragmatist account of aesthetic form, came out with Carl Hanser Verlag, München in 2013. He also co-edited a volume of essays on the topic of latency, entitled “Latenz”. Blinde Passagiere in den Geisteswissenschaften (with Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, at Vandenhoeck&Ruprecht, Göttingen, 2011). His work won the Bradley Rubidge Memorial Dissertation Award in Comparative Literature from Stanford University, and a 2009-2010 Geballe Dissertation Prize Fellowhip from the Stanford Humanities Center. Florian’s current work involves a broad engagement with pragmatism, in its American as well as European varieties; an investigation of life as activity from ancient to 20th century philosophy; a book project on modernist poetics of force.

Hina Nazar
Associate Professor of English, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Hina Nazar

Hina Nazar

Paper: “The Eyes of Others”: Rousseau and Adam Smith on Judgment and Autonomy

Biography coming soon.

Oliver O’Donovan
Professor of Christian Ethics and Practical Theology, University of Edinburgh

Oliver O'Donovan

Oliver O’Donovan

Paper: “Judge Not” and “Judge for Yourselves”

Oliver O’Donovan, born in 1945 in London, was Regius Professor of Moral & Pastoral Theology and Canon of Christ Church at the University of Oxford from 1982 until 2006, before which he taught at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford (1972-7) and at Wycliffe College, Toronto (1977-82).

He is a past President of the Society for the Study of Christian Ethics. Ordained as a priest of the Church of England, he has been an active participant in ecumenical dialogue and has served on the General Synod. He has been a Fellow of the British Academy since 2000. He has held distinguished visiting lectureships in the Universities of Durham and Cambridge, the Gregorian University in Rome, Mc Master University in Hamilton, Ontario, St. Patricks College, Maynooth, St. Johns College, Hong Kong, and Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California.

He is the author of The Problem of Self-Love in Saint Augustine (Yale 1979), Begotten or Made?(Oxford University Press, 1984), Resurrection and Moral Order (Eerdmans, 1986), On the Thirty-Nine Articles (Paternoster, 1986), Peace and Certainty (Eerdmans, 1989), The Desire of the Nations (Cambridge University Press, 1996), Common Objects of Love (Eerdmans, 2002) and The Ways of Judgment (2005).

Linda Zerilli
Faculty Director, Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality Charles E. Merriam Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago

Linda Zerilli

Linda Zerilli

Paper:  Toward a Democratic Theory of Judgment

Linda Marie-Gelsomina Zerilli is the Charles E. Merriam Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science and the College. She is currently Faculty Director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Zerilli is the author of Signifying Woman: Culture and Chaos in Rousseau, Burke, and Mill (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1994), Feminism and the Abyss of Freedom (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005), and articles on subjects ranging across feminist thought, the politics of language, aesthetics, and Continental philosophy. Her current book project is titled Toward a Democratic Theory of Judgment. She has been a Fulbright Fellow, a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, a Stanford Humanities Center Fellow, and has most recently won a Mellon Sawyer Seminar grant. Professor Zerilli has served on the executive committee of Political Theory and is currently serving on the editorial boards of the American Political Science Review, Philosophy and RhetoricConstellations, and Culture, Theory, and Critique.

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